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Kashrut at the Minyan

The Minyan has agreed on a set of practices regarding food brought to Minyan events such as kiddush at simchas, potlucks etc. These were adopted at the Town Meeting on Jan 14, 2010.

  • All food at Minyan events must be dairy or pareve.
  • All cooked food must come from kosher homes (see definition below). Those whose homes do not meet the Minyan's definition of a kosher home can purchase certified kosher food.
  • Commercially prepared cooked food, canned or packaged goods, or baked goods brought to Minyan functions must be kosher certified.
  • Raw greens (vegetables only) and fruit salads can come from any home.
  • All packaged domestic cheese is acceptable.

Bringing food to the Minyan or a Minyan event

  • In deference to those who observe the traditional prohibitions regarding carrying on Shabbat, members who live outside the eruv or drive to shul must bring food before Shabbat/chag.
  • Food for the Minyan must not be bought on Shabbat or chagim.
  • Food for the Minyan cannot be cooked on Shabbat.

Food for an event at a Minyan member's home

  • When the Minyan meets at individuals' homes for programs, shivah calls, etc., members should be sensitive to the host's kashrut requirements, which may be more stringent than our group standards. If in doubt, call and ask the person coordinating the food, or the host, to check the requirements.

Sources for information about kashrut

  • A non-exhaustive list of common certification symbols can be found at http://www.kashrut.com/agencies/.
  • Isaac Klein's Guide to Jewish Religious Practice (Amazon Link) is recommended as a source for kashrut standards acceptable to our group. If you have questions about whether your home meets the Minyan's policy, contact the Moderator.

No nuts, please

Due to allergies food served at the minyan must NOT CONTAIN ANY NUTS. If you are responsible for arranging food at services, please make sure it does not contain nuts — peanuts or tree nuts — and is not made in a facility that processes nuts.

Definition of a kosher home for cooking food for the minyan or minyan members:

  • All meat and poultry are purchased from a kosher butcher or prepackaged with kosher certification.
  • Only kosher fish — that is, those with fins and scales — are used. Shellfish and eels, for example, are not used. A list of kosher and non-kosher species can be found on the internet at http://www.kashrut.com/articles/fish/. Since there is a recognized school of thought that sturgeon and swordfish are kosher fish, it is acceptable if you use either within your home. However, do not use either sturgeon or swordfish in making any food for the minyan.
  • Meat and dairy dishes are separated in the kitchen: Meat and dairy dishes, pots, utensils, etc. are washed separately. Separate sponges, cloths, towels are used. Meat and dairy dishes are not concurrently washed together in the dishwasher. Separate dishes, pots, pans, utensils, and flatware are used for meat and dairy foods.

Items that don't require a hechsher

This section is not applicable on Pesach.

Jeff Remz compiled this list of items not requiring a hechsher (by contacting Star-K and OU)

  • Aluminum foil
  • Apple juice
  • Applesauce – PLAIN only
  • Baking powder
  • Baking soda
  • Beer – domestic, unflavored
  • Brand – unprocessed
  • Buckwheat – raw
  • Carob Powder
  • Cocoa powder – plain (NOT coca mix)
  • Coffee bean or ground – unflavored
  • Corn meal
  • Corn powder
  • Corn starch
  • Farina – plain, plain
  • Flour
  • Grains – raw
  • Lemon juice
  • Lime juice
  • Maple syrup – must be plain
  • Milk
  • Molasses – unflavored
  • Nuts – raw (if oil roasted, dry roasted and seasoned whether in or out of shell, a hechsher IS required)
  • Oats – raw
  • Olive Oil – extra virgin ONLY
  • Orange juice – 100% orange juice
  • Oven cleaner
  • Pineapple juice
  • Salt
  • Spices – pure, unblended does not require hechsher. Blended spices (e.g. chli powder) does
  • Sugar – cane, beet, brown confectioners
  • Tea - All teas, regular, decaffeinated and herbal, that do not list artificial or natural flavorings or colorings in the ingredients are acceptable without any Kosher supervision or certification. (If it contains artificial or natural flavorings/colorings, a hechsher is required)

Previous kashrut policy

This policy was retired at the Town Meeting of Jan 14, 2010. We list it here for historical and reference purposes.

The Minyan has agreed on a set of practices regarding food brought to minyan events. These were developed at a time when there were many potlucks and kiddushes were "home catered". However, they remain relevant to Sukkot and Simcha potlucks, and allow all members to participate in accordance with their levels of Jewish observance:

  • All food brought to Minyan must be dairy or pareve.
  • All cooked food must come from kosher homes. The Minyan does not question any member families' individual kashrut standards, but encourages you to consult with other members if you are unsure whether your own practices are acceptable to all Minyan members. Isaac Klein's Guide to Jewish Religious Practice is recommended as a source for kashrut standards acceptable to our group.
  • When the Minyan meets at individuals' homes for programs, shivah calls, and so on, please be sensitive to the host's kashrut requirements, which might be more stringent than our group standards. If in doubt, call and ask the person coordinating the food, or the host, to check their requirements.
  • In deference to those who observe the traditional prohibitions regarding carrying on Shabbat, bring food for potlucks before Shabbat/Chag if you live outside the eruv or must drive. If you are unable to deliver food before Shabbat, label it accordingly to inform those who would not knowingly eat it. Never buy food for the Minyan on Shabbat or chagim.
Mon, January 21 2019 15 Shevat 5779